What are easy piano songs? We were thinking about two-chord songs, what do you think? These are super easy to learn, no matter what skill level you are. A beginner can focus only on the chords, while a pro player can choose to spice things up and jam around on the same two triads. Do we have your attention? Great! Let’s dive in.

If someone told you that you could play top hit tracks with only two chords, what would you say? “Too good to be true!” Yeah, that’s what we thought. But this just got in: it is true!  Sometimes you just want to sit behind the keys, grab your uke, or just jam away on your guitar like there’s no tomorrow. That’s why we come to you with five super cool songs that are so easy to play, you just can’t resist ‘em. Enjoy!

‘Blurred Lines’ – Robin Thicke ft. T.I., Pharrell

It doesn’t get easier than this. Two basic chords is all it takes to play “Blurred Lines” by Robin Thicke. Chords that you most probably know by heart. Yes, even if you’re a beginner. How about the G chord, and the D chord? These are probably the first triads next to C you learned when you started playing the piano. The track is pretty basic and gives you the freedom to improvise if you wish to do so. How about figuring out the bass line? Just go wild and enjoy.

‘Eleanor Rigby’  – The Beatles

If you want to look cool and sophisticated, just play a Beatles song for your audience. Most of the classic tracks have that vintage sound and harmonics people love. The good news is that you can manage with only two chords. “Eleanore Rigby” by the Beatles from the Yellow Submarine album is your go to track when it comes to simplicity and nuance. Everything revolves around the Em chord, and the C chord.

Again two very basic triads you probably already know. When you want to go virtuoso on this song, you can try to improvise with seventh chords of course, but as a beginner just click the “Simplify Chords” button and enjoy playing these basic two triads.

‘Tulsa Time’ – Eric Clapton

Rock ‘n roll rules, right? Yes, it does indeed. If you want to know how to play rock ‘n roll, check out our School of Rock article. It doesn’t have to be that hard. ‘Cause you know what? If Eric Clapton can do it, so can you! Especially when it comes to the “Tulsa Time” chords. Yup, again there are only two chords that carry this song, the D chord, and the G chord. For all you pro players out there: try experimenting and improvising on these two chords. If you are just starting out, stick with the basic two triads.

‘Copperhead Road’ – Steve Earl

This one is for all you outlaws out there. Want to sound badass? Of course you do… And all it takes are the G chord, and the D chord. “Copperhead Road” by Steve Earl has that country and western twang mixed up with some good old rock. Together the sound makes you feel the warm wind in your face, and the sand grinding between your teeth.

Just focus on the front row of your audience – or look at yourself in the mirror – and give them the best snake eyes you got while chanting “Copperhead Roooahoood!” If you’re a more experienced player, try to spice up the chord progression by breaking the chords up in individual notes.

‘Everyday People’ – Sly and the Family Stone

Every party needs those funky tunes and chords. “Everyday People” by Sly and the Family Stone is the track you’re looking for if you want to warm up the crowd. Aren’t we all just everyday people? Yup, and we do want to get entertained! In this case it takes just – can you guess? – two chords indeed.

Try out the Ab chord and the G chord on your keys or fretboard. The first one could be challenging on guitar and ukulele if you are a beginner, but don’t get scared. It’s just two chords, you will definitely manage. Now go and funk away. Happy jamming!