Author Archives: Jorine Witte

New albums by Eels, Manic Street Preachers, 30 Seconds To Mars and Johan

Here are some new tunes to try out! Get ready to rock along with these new albums recently released by Eels, Manic Street Preachers, 30 Seconds To Mars and the Dutch indie band Johan.

And while you’re at it, you might as well check out A Perfect Circle’s new record Eat The Elephant, released 14 years (!) after their previous album Emotive. Happy jamming! 

Manic Street Preachers – Resistance Is Futile 

Release date: April 6th
Single:  Distant Colours
Chords: E F#m7 B D A
Tip: Use your pedals to create the right sound.

Eels – The Deconstruction 

Release date: April 6th
Single: Bone Dry
Chords: Gm F Eb Dm Bb Cm C Dbdim D
Tip: A lot of different chords and high tempo, perfect for practicing your fast fingering.

 

30 Seconds To Mars – America

Release date: April 6th
Single: Dangerous Night
Chords: Bm G D A Em
Tip: Easy chords and very easy to play along.

Johan – Pull Up 

Release date: April 13th
Single: About time
Chords: D7 G D/F# Cmaj7 Em7 D
Tip: This song contains the quite unusual chord D/F#.

A Perfect Circle – Eat The Elephant

Release date: April 19th
Single: TalkTalk
Chords: C#m A F#m C# F# E D Em B C A# D#
Tip: Also interesting to try a different version on the piano.

Chordify in the top 5,000 of biggest websites worldwide

According to Alexa, Chordify belongs to the top 5,000 of the biggest websites worldwide. A special thanks goes out to all you heavy users, loyal visitors and spontaneous guests. Without you we would never have achieved this milestone!

Chordify iOS App

Alexa ranks the sites on metrics like the number of pageviews, the duration of page visits, the amount of linked sites and search traffic statistics. The web analytics service puts Chordify.net at place 4,901 in the world ranking list, that counts all active websites. Which is around 200 million at the time of writing.

The Chordify WebApp has been online since January 2013. The entry into the top 5,000 illustrates the exponential growth that the company has gone through in the last five years. Since then the company has welcomed more than 100 million unique visitors. As of today millions of songs have been chordified, and over a million people have registered to the service. 

5 essential ukulele accessories – the fun and the functional

Ukuleles are more popular than ever before, and why wouldn’t they be? Ukuleles are a great instrument, they’re fun, relatively affordable and a good starting point for people who want to learn an instrument. They’re also pretty small and portable, so it is easy to see why a lot of people opt for them as their first step into playing music.

This is a guest post by Ben from Subreel, a website featuring music how-to guides, equipment reviews, and much more.

If you’ve recently started playing, you’ll need to learn not only the basics of how your ukulele works, chords and finger positions, you’ll also need to learn about accessories. “How many can there be?” I hear you ask. Well, a surprising amount, but we’re here to help you navigate through these accessories, from the fun to the functional.

1. Gig Bag or Case

What good is a portable instrument if you don’t have the right equipment to carry it around? The only way to take care of a ukulele on the go is by using either a gig bag (these will normally be padded) or a hard case. Either way, these will protect your ukulele against everything from rain to bumps and scratches. Gig bags also usually have space for all of your other accessories…

2. Tuner

Strings will inevitably go out of tune, it happens naturally, not just by knocking the tuning pegs, so the tuner is a pretty essential item! You can get tuners which have the ability to tune multiple instruments, or tuners specific to the ukulele. If you are a beginner, a ukulele tuner can make sure you don’t make any mistakes. The standard tuning for a ukulele is GCEA (from top to bottom as you look at the strings).

3. Stand

When your ukulele is at home, whether in a home studio or just in your bedroom, you’ll probably want it to be on display! Not just because it looks nice, but because it will remind you to keep picking it up and practicing. A ukulele stand means it is always there at your fingertips, but safely kept (leaning against a chair is a recipe for disaster!) If you own an expensive ukulele, you should definitely buy a high-end, sturdy stand to ensure the worst doesn’t happen.

4. Capo

A capo is an essential piece of kit for players of all sorts of stringed instruments, and the ukulele is no different! A capo covers all of the strings of your ukulele and effectively changes the length of the strings you are playing, and therefore the pitch, making it easier to play certain songs. A capo can also be used to change the pitch of a song to suit your vocal range, so it is a very useful piece of kit for those who sing along when playing.

5. String Care Accessories

Strings are, of course, vital to your playing! For beginners especially, it can be easy to ignore the strings and assume they will sound the same, but strings that aren’t cared for can become dull and even rusty over time, meaning you will have to replace them sooner. Accessories to help with this include a string cleaner, which is designed to wipe across the strings and remove grease and other residue. Other string care accessories include humidifiers, which ensure that the humidity in your case is kept at the right level to avoid damage to strings or the wood of your instrument.

Conclusion

It can feel overwhelming when you start out any musical journey, but the above accessories are nothing to be daunted by if you are a beginner. They will all help you to become a better ukulele player over time. As you become a more accomplished musician, your accessories will likely evolve, along with your style of playing. This is just the first step.

Freshly new layout for Chordify.net

Inspired by fresh spring/summer fashion and some serious spring cleaning, we proudly present a brand new layout for the Chordify website!


Outkast – So fresh and so clean

As you can see, the sidebar has transformed into a topbar, which provides more room for chords, articles and everything else you look for by using Chordify. The YouTube video’s are moved to the right, as well as the song suggestions. In the weeks to come, you might expect some more improvements, along the way.

With all things new, it might take some time to get used to, but we hope you will come to enjoy the new layout as much as we do. The paint job of this Chordify vehicle now matches the fancy pancy chord generating AI under the hood.

So kick back in the sun, sip your favorite cold drink, and enjoy the freshly brewed Chordify layout, while practicing your campfire summer hits. Please let us know what you think by giving us some feedback. Cheers!

Grateful Dead, Tate McRae and Ed Sheeran in Top 5 March

Have you been practicing that one song over and over and over again? You were not alone! The numbers don’t lie. Looking at the stats from March, we can extract some interesting Top 5s of the most played songs from around the globe. You’ll find Ed Sheeran, Tate McRae, Daniel Caesar and the Grateful Dead amongst many other local heroes. Happy jamming!

Top 5 Europe

  1. Ana Guerra y Aitana – Lo Malo 
  2. Ed Sheeran – Perfect
  3. Sfera Ebbasta – Cupido (cover)
  4. Zespół 3Style – Ty Mała Znów Zarosłaś! 
  5. Felix Sandman – Every Single Day 
Ana Guerra y Aitana 

Top 5 Northern America

  1. Daniel Caesar – Best Part (feat. H.E.R.)
  2. Bazzi – Mine 
  3. Milo Manheim, Meg Donnelly – Someday (From “ZOMBIES”)
  4. Florian Bur – My World
  5. Rex Orange County – BEST FRIEND
Daniel Caesar – Best Part

Top 5 Asia

  1. IV OF SPADES – Mundo 
  2. Ruperi valu soneri lata/govyachya kinaryavar
  3. Oporadhi (অপরাধী) | Charpoka (ছারপোকা) 
  4. D’GO Vaspa feat Tika Dewi – Tresna Kanti Mati
  5. Govyachya Kinaryavar
IV OF SPADES

Top 5 Oceania

  1. Grateful Dead – Weather Report Suite 
  2. “Nothing’s Forever” – Jamestown Story 
  3. Link – Tuhia
  4. One Day by Tate McRae
  5. SIX60 – Rivers 
Grateful Dead

Top 5 South America

  1. Dulce Pecado – Jessi Uribe 
  2. Tema principal de La casa de papel | Cecilia Krull 
  3. Amor Infinito – letra
  4. Paulo Londra ft Lenny Tavarez – Nena Maldicion 
  5. HOY ME DESPERTÉ EN LA MADRUGADA LETRA – GRUPO FORTALEZA
Jessi Uribe

Top 5 Africa

  1. 3 Daqat – Abu Ft. Yousra 
  2. Hayawani Nyashinski Reggae Cover by Keam Kym x Melifla
  3. Bro Sammy, Menso Mene Hwan Powerful Worship
  4. Zouhair Bahaoui – Désolé 
  5. Ed Sheeran – Perfect
3 Daqat

New albums by Kylie Minogue, Hinds, The Vaccines and The Boxer Rebellion

The brand-new albums are piling up again! Get cracking on your pop prowess with Kylie Minogue’s refreshing comeback album, Golden. Unleash your punk attitude with UK’s The Vaccines or spur your overdrive with Spanish girl band Hinds. Also, muchas gracias to The Boxer Rebellion, who are topping off the list with a beautiful balled to soothe our souls.

Happy jamming!

The Vaccines – Combat Sports

Release date: March 30th
Single: Night Club
Chords: Bm D G Em D/F# A
Tip: Skip to the chorus to practice some fast fingering.

The Boxer Rebellion – Ghost Alive

Release date: March 30th
Single: Here I Am
Chords: F Bb Dm
Tip: Easy learning, with only three chords.

Hinds – I Don’t Run 

Release date: April 6th
Single: The Club
Chords: C C/E F Am G#/E G/D G#/D# E G G# Fm
Tip: These chords may sound a bit unusual, but they are not that difficult.

Kylie Minogue – Golden

Release date: April 6th
Single: Stop me from Falling
Chords: Db Ab Bbm Gb
Tip: Try this on your Western guitar to get your audience line dancing, instantly.

Spice up your Easter with these musical highlights

Taken by a constant stream of crisply laid musical talent, farm-fresh festival hits, and perfectly peeled pop albums, we would almost forget that in previous centuries, humanity has produced some beautiful music as well. Easter is the perfect time to dwell on some of the musical highlights that retell the passion of Jesus Christ.

Wherever your religious roots may lay, the following examples stand as absolute pinnacles of artistic excellence. Listen to our selection of Easter highlights and you will understand why these belong to the most played and reinterpreted musical pieces on earth.  

Jesus Christ Superstar

The rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar was written by two British men, Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, who were only in their early twenties at the time. Jesus Christ Superstar was first released as a concept album in 1970.

The modern lyrics, hooks and multi-layered compositions turn the rock opera into a truly unique and fresh reconfiguration of the traditional Biblical story. While not everyone appreciated the earthly and human portrayal of the son of God, Jesus Christ Superstar became extraordinarily popular.

St Matthew Passion

The St Matthew Passion is one the most famous (and longest) works by Johann Sebastian Bach. This sacred oratorio was first performed between 1725 and 1729 in Leipzig, Germany. The name already suggests that this piece is based on the gospel according to Saint Matthew.

What makes it special, are the chorales and the arias that serve as a reflection on the biblical story. The texts and the melodies that Bach appropriated for this piece originate from the Lutheran book of hymns and was very well known at the time, because everyone sung these at Sunday mass. Around 300 years after its premiere St Matthew Passion is still one of the most performed oratories in the world.

King’s College Choir

King’s College Choir is a boys choir from Cambridge, constituted in 1441. The choir is one the most important representatives of the British church music tradition and is especially well known for its Christmas mass, first aired by the BBC in 1928.

According to their own words King’s College offers “probably the best musical education available to boys between the ages eight and thirteen”. And noticeably so. The performances of King’s College Choir lift the old hymns and psalms to unprecedented musical heights, which is why they are a delight for both soul and ear.

Happy Easter jamming!

Spice up your Easter with all highlights from the Easter channel!

Four Essential Jazz Chords for Beginners

Here’s a guest post from our jazz friends over at jazzguitarlessons.net.

Mention jazz chords to beginners and everybody automatically pictures a chord description longer than their mailing address. 

In reality they are no different than any other chord to learn, and you have probably listened to many jazz chords in everything from pop songs to rock. We’ll take a look at some basic jazz chords and add a little flavor to your soundscape.

What is a Jazz Chord?

There really isn’t a specific chord that belongs solely to one genre or another, it’s just that certain types of chords are often more prevalent in some genres than others. They imbue the music with a specific character.

Most jazz chords contain a 7th.

I won’t delve too deeply into any theory here but basically each note in a scale is a certain degree away from the root note such as the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and so on.

C Major Diatonic Scale

Note C D E F G A B
Degree I II III IV V VI VII
root 2 3 4 5 6 7

So, in a C major scale the 7th is a B note.

If we were to highlight the first, the third and the fifth degrees in the above table we would have a basic triad, whereby the minimum amount of notes in the proper intervals of thirds have been met in order to be classified as a chord. Add the B (7th) and we have a CM7 chord.

The degree numbers depicted in Roman numerals are in keeping with traditional Western music and are common even today.

Four Essential Jazz Chords

The following chords are important to know because they represent the most common chords in jazz that will actually allow you to play along with many jazz songs.

  1. Major 7 (M)
  2. minor 7 (m)
  3. Dominant 7
  4. Diminished 7

Major 7

You will see the major 7th also described in lead sheets and music with the following symbols.

  • C▲
  • C and number 7 with a slash through the stem
  • CM7 (must be a capital M)
  • Major 7
  • Maj 7

Grab your guitar and we’ll start with some CM7 chords to get your fingers around.  Let’s start on the third fret.

Here it is on the eighth fret.

Be careful with the muted strings.

Both of these chord formations are movable up and down the neck to play other chords such as DM7 on the 10th fret and so on.

Minor 7

Here is how to identify a minor 7th chord on charts and music sheets.

  • minor 7
  • min 7
  • m7 (must have a small m)
  • -7 (a minus sign)

Make sure you still have your guitar because in the 8th fret chord we’ll make you look and sound like you’ve been playing with the jazz greats all your life.

For the following chord formation jazz guitarists will play this chord with the second and third fingers as shown here. You’ll get some real jazz cred with this one. Like any new chord this can seem awkward at first but as you advance in your skills you will notice the benefits of this fingering.

The trickiest part about these chords is ensuring you are not sounding the muted strings and that all other notes can be heard when played independently.

Dominant 7

The dominant 7 chord printed on charts and music sheets are as follows.

  • 7
  • 7th
  • Sometimes dom 7

Dominant chords are basically the chord with a number after it. There is no major or minor definition included with this one.

You should note however, that if a bracketed number is written after the chord, this means that it is an altered dominant chord with an added 9th or 13th degree perhaps. We will discuss these chords a little bit later.

Try these ones out.

Diminished 7

The diminished 7 chord is indicated as follows:

  • dim 7
  • diminished (b5)

 

Observation

You may have noticed that all four of the above chord types merely move one or more of the note degrees by flattening or sharpening them.

For example, if we have a CM7 chord, we can show the relationship to the root note as follows.

CM7

The highlighted columns depict each note of the chord chronologically from the root.

The E (third) is played by the fourth finger here on the 5th fret.

Now, notice in the minor chord diagram below where the third and the seventh are played on the fretboard.

The third in this minor 7 chord is on the fourth fret now while the major 7 chord is on the fifth.  By moving the note down by one fret, we have flattened the third to an Eb.

You will notice that the 7th has also been flatted (moved down 1 fret) to a Bb.

This is what makes a major 7th chord into a minor 7th chord (flatten 3rd and 7th).

Play the major and minor chords one after the other to hear the difference.

I know that we were not going to talk too much about theory but learning a bit will really help you out in your understanding of these different types of chords we have talked about.

For instance, each type of chord we have shown here has its own formula by degree.

  • major 7     1-3-5-7
  • dom 7        1-3-5-b7
  • minor 7    1-b3-5-b7
  • dim 7        1-b3-b5-bb7 (double flat, as in moved down two frets)

Summary

Jazz chords are played primarily in closed positions and often higher on the neck to give that jazz sound. By closed, I mean each note is fingered and there are no open strings sounding. This is in comparison to some of the first chords you may have learned near the headstock of your guitar such as E minor with only two notes fingered and the rest of the strings played open.

Also, we have talked a little bit about theory and I recommend you learn more if interested.

Autumn Leaves” is a ‘jazz standard‘ for you to practice your new chords on. There are many more chords and songs to learn and I hope you were able to get a start with these.

Enjoy!

About the Author
Marc-Andre Seguin is the webmaster, “brains behind” and teacher on JazzGuitarLessons.net, the #1 online resource for learning how to play jazz guitar. He draws from his experience both as a professional jazz guitarist and professional jazz teacher to help thousands of people from all around the world learn the craft of jazz guitar.

New albums by Superorganism, Moby, David Byrne and Joan Baez

Hype hype hooray! The debut album from Superorganism is finally here. This is an absolute favorite for the festival season this summer. Next to this newcomer, also a lot of old-timers with new releases. Talking Heads front man David Byrne is making a comeback (his latest release dates from 2012 already). Moby makes an appearance with a poetic and profound record. At age 77 folk legend Joan Boaz is busy with her worldwide farewell tour. Whistle Down the Wind will be her last record, for now. Happy jamming!

Superorganism – Superorganism

Release date: March 2nd
Single: Everybody Wants To Be Famous
Chords: Bb Gm F
Tip: The ideal song to try out your most outlandish effects.

Moby – Everything Was Beautiful, and Nothing Hurt

Release date: March 2nd
Single: This Wild Darkness
Chords: D Am G
Tip: Nice song to practice your plucking skills.

Joan Baez – Whistle Down the Wind

Release date: March 2nd
Single: Whistle Down the Wind
Chords: Bb F Cm7 Eb C7 Gm
Tip: Tom waits co-authored the title song from Whistle Down the Wind.

David Byrne – American Utopia

Release date: March 9th
Single: Everybody’s Coming To My House
Chords: C#m A/C# B/C# F#m B E G#m
Tip: Great song to practice your barre grip.

Music industry gender balance screams for more girlpower

How are women faring in the most important rankings in the music biz? The disparity between men and women at the top is more severe than you might have initially thought.

In the music industry women are applauded in several ways; there are awards for the best female music executive (Women In Music), best female conductor (BBC Music Magazine), and even the Grammy Awards highlight women when they can.

That women are awesome is old news, we don’t need an international women’s day to spread awareness for that. What we do need however, is a better balance between men and women in the music industry–you’ll be surprised to find the incredible inequality still present in 2018.

The numbers don’t lie: Pitchfork looked into the gender imbalance in the lineups of the most prominent music festivals. This past summer, 74% of the performances were by all male acts, compared to 12% all female and 14% mixed acts.

How are women faring in the most important rankings in the music biz?

#2 Beyonce – highest-paid artist

The absolute epitome of emancipation in the music industry is without a doubt Queen Bey. She’s a close second to front-runner Sean Combs in Forbes’ list of highest paid artists of 2017. “Beyonce pulling in a whopping $105 million pretax” That it’s lonely at the top will become clear when you go searching for the second lady in the list: Adele is in 9th place with an income of $69 million in 2017. In total, you’ll only find 5 women total in the top 25 of highest-paid musicians.

#15 Rihanna – most streamed artist

In 2017 we listened to more music made by male artists than by female artists. Now, that by itself is not necessarily an issue, since global monster hits such as those by Ed Sheeran or Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee are simply very rare as it is. What is telling however, is that there is no female artist present in the top 5. Or top 10.. No, Rihanna–the most streamed female artist in 2017–can be found in 15th place.

#42 Nervo – best DJ

When we take a glance at the renowned Top 100 DJs list, we’ll actually notice that the gender imbalance in pop music doesn’t look that bad compared to EDM. The first female DJ we’ll find.. (scroll down) at.. (scroll some more).. number 42! One year earlier Nervo got nominated as best female DJ act as well–at that time she was still at spot 45.

Numbers like these prove the disparity in the music industry and that it is in dire need of girlpower. But before you dust off your Spice Girl costumes and ride to battle, how can it be that this male-female difference is so large?

Until we can answer that question meaningfully, there will hopefully have risen a whole new army of Beyoncés that will tip the scale toward equality again. For now 45 prominent festivals have signed a pledge to have a fair 50/50 gender balance across their headliners at their festivals by 2022. And also, let’s not forget and underestimate the power of ourselves as listeners, fans, and festival audience; as Mel B would say: “I’ll tell you what I want what I really really want”.